The drumbeat of politicians sounding the alarm about the need to rethink how we educate children in this country is music to my ears. But the rhythm of the conversation, which tends to focus on Science, Technology,Engineering, and Math, is missing a beat: STEM needs an A, for the Arts. How did I learn this? The hard way… […]
" /> Mickey Hart: There’s a Fire on the Mountain Innovatie Dagblad
bannerTop

Mickey Hart: There’s a Fire on the Mountain

The drumbeat of politicians sounding the alarm about the need to rethink how we educate children in this country is music to my ears. But the rhythm of the conversation, which tends to focus on Science, Technology,Engineering, and Math, is missing a beat: STEM needs an A, for the Arts.

How did I learn this? The hard way… I hated science in high school. Technology? Engineering? Math? Why would I ever need this? Little did I realize that music was also about science, technology, engineering and mathematics, all rolled into one. As I began to fulfill my dreams these skills became my allies, my new instrument.

The more I studied music the more I recognized rhythmic patterns in nature and the relationship between the vibrations of a drum and the geometry of the universe. When my old friend Bill Graham was “recycling” concert tickets twice, and then paying us for half, I learned to count. Math class in session. When the Grateful Dead needed a quality sound system to deliver our sonic payload, I learned electronics and speaker design. Engineering class in session. When the Deadheads recorded and distributed our performances worldwide, I learned about computer networks. Technology class in session.

Now the kid who hated science and math in high school works with the Nobel-prize winning astrophysicist George Smoot, collaborating on how to create music from the epic events created in the forming of the universe — from the Big Bang to the galaxies, the stars and the planets.

I also joined forces with neurologist Oliver Sacks, who has shown me the power music and rhythm play in awakening a damaged mind as documented in the new film The Music Never Stopped. Science now tells us that vibrations reconnect damaged neural pathways, meaning music therapy can be as healing as physical therapy.

Mickey Hart: There’s a Fire on the Mountain.


Tags: ,

Trackback  •  Posted by Rene in community category

 

Comments are closed. Please check back later.